Report from the Front

Art criticism, sometimes with context, occasional politics. Published in hard copy 5-7 times a year. New shows: "events;" hard-copy rates & how to support the online edition: "works."

DELACROIX IN THE AGE OF DUCHAMP

October 15, 2018

Tags: Delacroix

Eugène Delacroix, (French, 1798–1863), Young Tiger Playing with Its Mother, 1830. Oil on canvas, 130 x 195 cm. Musée du Louvre, Paris © RMN-Grand Palais (Musée du Louvre) / Franck Raux
Was Eugène Delacroix (1798-1863) a young radical? An old radical? Or was he merely another ambitious member of the 19th century French art-world Establishment following tamely in the footsteps of Ingres? Attempting to deal with these issues is “Delacroix,” the sprawling and lovely retrospective that has come to The Metropolitan Museum of Art after its inaugural run at The Louvre earlier this year (and here in New York through January 6).

Alas, instead of answering these questions, the show shies away from them-- primarily through its accompanying literature, but also (even if necessary) through its choice of work to display. (more…)

VON DAVID BIS DELACROIX

October 6, 2011

Tags: David, Ingres, Gericault, Delacroix

Théodore Géricault (1791-1824). Leda and the Swan, ca.1816-17. Brown wash and blue watercolor, with black chalk, heightened with white gouache, on brown paper. Musée du Louvre, Réunion des Musées Nationaux/Art Resource, NY. Photography: Jean-Gilles Berizzi.

To the unsophisticated art-lover, a drawing is merely lines made by a pencil or pen upon a piece of paper. To a museum curator, a drawing can be almost anything except a print, as long as it’s made on paper (sometimes not even then) This means that a drawing can be colored with (more…)