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Report from the Front

Art criticism, sometimes with context, occasional politics. Published in hard copy 2-4 times a year. New shows: "events;" hard copy rates & how to support the online edition: "works."

 

THREE SHOWS IN HONOR OF THE ART STUDENTS LEAGUE

Ronnie Landfield, Lady Grey, 1971.  Acrylic on canvas, 90 x 52 1/2 inches.

 

 

Maybe some of my readers have never heard of The Art Students League of New York, founded in 1875, but it's that rare institution where teachers teach and students learn -- all without enrollling in courses, taking exams and receiving degrees.  Such a setup seems to suit artists  fine, so over the years, the League has attracted a remarkable body of teachers & students  Many of these were included in three recent shows that I truly wish I had gotten around to writing about while they were still up. Read More 

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MAC AND MARK AT THE NEUE GALERIE

Franz Marc (1880–1916), The Yellow Cow, 1911. Oil on canvas. Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York. Solomon R. Guggenheim Founding Collection.
 

 

 

"Mac and Mark" is the sacrilegious way I refer to two excellent painters associated with German Expressionism, Franz Marc (1880-1916) and August Macke (1887-1914). Together with Wassily Kandinsky, Gabrielle Münter, and other German and émigré artists based in & around Munich, these two Germans formed the group that exhibited in 1911 and 1912 under the name of Der Blaue Reiter, and published Der Blaue Reiter Almanac in 1912.  Both Marc and Macke – good friends with each other -- were killed in action during World War I, so to commemorate these promising careers cut short by forces beyond their control, the Neue Galerie is staging a highly colorful and engaging show, "Franz Marc and August Macke: 1909-1914"  (through January 21). Read More 

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MEDIEVAL ARMENIA AT THE MET

Khachkar. Lori Berd, 12th–13th century. Basalt. 72 × 383⁄4 × 9 in. (182.9 × 98.4 × 22.9 cm). History Museum of Armenia, Yerevan Photo: Hrair Hawk Khatcherian and Lilit Khachatryan.

First the Virgin Mary, at the Frick. Now a cross, the symbol of the Crucifixion, to illustrate my review of "Armenia!" at The Metropolitan Museum of Art (through January 13). But can I help it if art made way back in the Middle Ages still has the mysterious power to enchant us, and if the art which has survived since then is mostly religious?

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"THE PRICE OF EVERYTHING," OR, "DUMBO" V. DA VINCI

Larry Poons in "The Price of Everything"

One major topic of gossip these past few months in the little sub-community of the art world that I inhabit has been the 98-minute documentary entitled "The Price of Everything." The main reason we are interested is that for all practical purposes, its hero is our own Larry Poons, who has thus emerged at the unlikely age of 81 as a movie star. But the film has other attractions as well.

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CHRISTMAS AT THE FRICK

Petrus Christus, The Virgin and Child with St. Barbara and Jan Vos (also known as "The Exeter Virgin"), ca. 1450. Oil on panel, 7 5/8 × 5 ½ inches. Staatliche Museen zu Berlin, Gemäldegalerie

What could be more appropriate for the Christmas season than an image of the Virgin and Child? And here is The Frick Collection, giving us not one but two fine versions of that subject, in "The Charterhouse of Bruges: Jan Van Eyck, Petrus Christus and Jan Vos" (though January 13).

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A GOOD AUTUMN FOR FINE ABSTRACTION

This has been a good autumn in New York for fine abstraction. As a result, I am able to present my second set of multi-image entries since Labor Day, again all celebrating shows of fine abstract art. All but one of this latest crop close before Christmas, and I have taken up too much time running around to look at them, so I don’t have the additional time needed to discuss them at length. Therefore I shall below illustrate and discuss as briefly as possible five shows that you might really want to look at for yourselves: those with art by Stuart Davis, Al Loving, Walter Darby Bannard, Morris Louis & Jules Olitski. In addition, I shall comment upon two lesser solo shows: of abstract work by Mary Weatherford & Elizabeth Neel, a show of representational painting by Walton Ford, and the mix of abstract & figurative work in a group show called “The Joy of Color.” Read More 
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MARY WEATHERFORD, ELIZABETH NEEL & STUART DAVIS

"Lines Thicken: Stuart Davis in Black and White" at Paul Kasmin. Installation shot.

On September 28, Roberta Smith in The New York Times ran a long article about seven abstract painters having exhibitions in Manhattan. Along with Larry Poons, Frank Bowling, and Ed Clark – all of whom I too reviewed on September 28 -- she celebrated two further shows in Chelsea “Mary Weatherford: I’ve Seen Seven Gray Whales Go By” at Gagosian (closed October 15) and “Elizabeth Neel: Tangled on a Serpent Chair” at Mary Boone (closed October 27). On October 5, I saw these two shows, as well as "Lines Thicken: Stuart Davis in Black and White" at Paul Kasmin (through December 22). Read More 

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AL LOVING

Al Loving, James, 1989. Mixed media on paper collage, 32 x 87 inches. Courtesy of the Estate of Al Loving and Garth Greenan.
Pleasure of a more recent vintage awaited me on my next trip to Chelsea. The source is the latest show of Alvin D. Loving (1935-2005), better known as Al Loving, and occupying the handsome new space of Garth Greenan on ground level at 545 West 20th Street. There are only eight pieces of work in “Al Loving: Space, Time, Light” (through December 21), but they come from between 1977 and 1993, which is perhaps my favorite period in this gifted artist’s long career. Read More 
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WALTON FORD, WALTER DARBY BANNARD

Walter Darby Bannard, Peru, 1971. Alkyd resin on canvas, 51 x 55 inches. Courtesy Berry Campbell.
This time, my destination in Chelsea was “Walter Darby Bannard: Paintings from 1969-1975” at Berry Campbell (through December 21), but on the way I stopped in to see “Walton Ford: Barbary” at the handsome new “flagship” gallery of Paul Kasmin at 509 West 27th Street (through December 22). Read More 
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MORRIS LOUIS

Morris Louis (1912-1962), Twined Columns II, 1960. Magna on canvas, 102.52 x 140 inches (260.4 x 355.6 cm. Inv#3180. Courtesy of Yares Art.
Moving on up from Chelsea to midtown we come to Yares Art on Fifth Avenue, and a truly lovely exhibition of fifteen (count ‘em, 15) classic color-field paintings entitled “Morris Louis: Spectrum.” This show will be on through January 12, 2019, though if you plan to visit it between Christmas and New Year’s, you will need to call the gallery, as they had not yet decided which days during that period they would be open when I visited the show). Read More 
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