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Report from the Front

Art criticism, sometimes with context, occasional politics. Published in hard copy 2-4 times a year. New shows: "events;" hard copy rates & how to support the online edition: "works."

 

BELATED REPORT: BOOKS AT CAA

"London's New Scene: Art and Culture in the 1960s," by Lisa Tickner (published in London in 2020 by the Paul Mellon Centre for Studies in British Art, distributed in the U.S. by Yale University Press)

 

This year, as always, the College Art Association held a Book & Trade Fair during its annual conference in February – but of course this year it was all different, i.e. everything was virtual.   Convention "goers" simply paid their entrance fees and zoomed into the book-and-trade-fair display at the CAA website on their computers. Companies with products to sell to artists and art historians set up separate "booths" and displayed their wares – or at least (in the case of artists' materials suppliers, like Golden Artist Colors) mainly reminded convention "goers" of their existence. Read More 

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TWO STORY-TELLERS

Walker Evans (American, 1903–1975). Citizen in Downtown Havana. 1932. Gelatin silver print. 9 3/8 x 5 1/16″ (23.8 x 12.9 cm). Lily Auchincloss Fund. Credit: The Museum of Modern Art.
For some reason, I seem to be wallowing in representational art this summer & autumn. But representational isn’t necessarily bad – just as abstraction isn’t necessarily good. In this case, we have two story-telling artists, and although narratives can be boring, I found these two with something to say.  Read More 
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